Goal 9

Youth Employment - Deep Dive

Nova Scotia’s youth unemployment rate will be at, or better than, the national rate in that year.

Updated:

Youth Employment
Youth Employment Deep Dive

Movements in the unemployment rate can be influenced by two factors:  the relative ease with which people who are looking for work can find it, and the number of people who are looking for work. An unemployment rate decrease could be due to an increase in employment, a decrease in the number of people who are looking for work but not employed, or a combination of both.

yearlabour forceemploymentunemployment
20127762.714.3
201374.961.213.7
201473.760.613.1
201573.161.911.2
201669.359.110.3
201769.257.711.6

Since 2012, the continuing decline in the youth population in Nova Scotia has meant that the number of youth in the labour force, employed youth, and unemployed youth looking for work have also been in decline. In 2017, the number of unemployed youth increased, accompanied by only a modest decrease in the youth labour force. 

However, it is the relative rates – the labour force participation rate and the employment rate – that explain the changing youth unemployment rate. Between 2012 and 2016, the employment rate increased by 0.6 percentage points, while the youth participation rate fell by 2.2 points. Over the last year, there has been a reversal – the youth employment rate declined 0.7 percentage points and the labour force participation rose by 0.6 points. This suggests that a larger proportion of young people have been having a hard time finding jobs, leading to a higher unemployment rate in 2017.

yearparticipationemploymentunemployment
201265.30%53.20%18.60%
201364.50%52.70%18.30%
201464.70%53.20%17.80%
201565.50%55.50%15.30%
201663.10%53.80%14.90%
201763.70%53.10%16.80%

Breaking out the unemployment rate for 15-19-year-olds and 20-24-years-olds shows that changes in the youth unemployment rate have primarily been due to improvements among 20-24-year-olds, with the unemployment rate among 15-19-year-olds in 2016 very close to what it was in 2012. However, the gap has widened for both groups over the last year.

yearcanada-15-19ns-15-19canada-20-24ns-20-24
197615.620.210.213.5
197717.120.311.614.4
197817.620.711.615.2
197915.922.110.415.1
198016.11910.614.4
19811618.910.615.1
198221.524.716.219.8
198321.824.917.819.9
198419.722.916.119.8
198518.323.914.420.1
198616.521.213.620.2
198714.819.112.318
198812.817.310.714.6
198912.816.59.714.2
199013.916.911.314.6
199116.618.915.419.8
199219.320.615.920
199319.624.115.720
199418.321.314.422.4
199517.7201318.4
199619.419.612.916.9
199721.424.313.118.6
199819.920.912.118.1
199918.321.311.216.4
200016.521.110.112.4
200116.820.810.215.4
2002182110.615.7
200318.117.910.614.2
200418.119.810.312
200516.519.79.711.9
200615.916.78.811.9
200714.817.28.710
200815.517.48.910.5
20092022.112.214.6
20102020.511.613.7
201119.522.71112.9
201220.1211117.1
201319.523.910.415.2
201418.521.810.715.5
201518.221.210.411.8
201617.821.510.611.2
201715.9229.313.5

Changes to the indicator, baseline, or target:

  • The baseline youth unemployment rate was revised down due to historical revisions by Statistics Canada.
  • Contextual numbers were removed from the statement of the goal. The target was assumed to be the closure of the gap between the Nova Scotia and Canadian youth unemployment rates, not for the Nova Scotia rate to fall to the Canadian rate of 14 per cent quoted for context in the Now or Never report. This was done to keep the goal consistent in case of future historical revisions to the source data.